1. Write down the names, telephone numbers (cell, home and work), and emails of everyone in your family who can vote (18 years of age and older and a Canadian citizen) and do not forget to include your grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins, family friends and neighbours. Ask each one of them if they have registered to vote and if not show them how they can find the nearest voting (polling) station just by using their postal code
  2. If they are not yet registered, then most important of all, tell them that they can also register and vote on their provincial Election Day at the voting (polling) station. All they need is a photo id with their current address and a second piece of identification. If they have moved recently, then bring an electricity or gas or telephone bill or anything else as proof of where they live now.
  3. By law, their boss has to give them a total of three hours in a row off to vote.
  4. Try and help out your elderly neighbours and those with special needs by seeing if you can car pool or if someone can give them a ride to the voting (polling) station.
  5. For more updates you can find visit the provincial Elections' website or by visiting www.humanesociety.com.
  6. Learn more about the challenges facing people, animals and the environment using a wide range of references to get all sides of the issues. You can also visit www.humanesociety.com
  7. Contact the head of each party directly and learn more about where they stand on the issues that matter to you.
  8. Follow the link here for more information about where parties stand on protecting people, animals and the environment.
  9. Make your own banners, write a blog, make a video, go viral to spread your messages or set up your own pages.
  10. Over the next few days left before Election Day, send your family and friends regular updates and and ask if they are going to vote, and find out if you can answer any questions or provide them with any information.
  11. On Election Day, before you leave for school [remember the voting (polling) stations open at 9 am] and then again after you get home from school remind your family and friends to get out and vote.
  12. Get Out The Vote means you made a difference for people, animals and the environment, and just as importantly for your future. After all, you are the one that will have to live with the results of what happens on Election Day.
  13. We want to hear your stories about what you did? How many people did you encourage to vote? What challenges did you face and how did you overcome them? Send them to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. We'll publish them on a special website for everyone to see and learn from.
  14. What would you do next time? We'll publish them on a special website for everyone to see and learn from. Send them into This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and we'll publish them on a special website for website for everyone to see and learn from.
  15. After the election, what happens next? What do you think should be the next step? How do hold politicians and civil servants to their promises? How do you make them understand what’s important to you? What can you do to continue making your community and Canada a better place for people, animals and the environment? Send your thoughts and ideas to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and we'll publish them on a special website for everyone to see and learn from.